Business Name:  MINING VENTURES

Staff/Proprietor:

Name

Race

P.S.A.

STR/S TA

DEX/ RS

INT/L OG

PER/L DR

PS

IM

RW

MW

Special Abilities

Skills

Equipment

 

Human

Military

60/65

60/70

40/45

40/45

3

7

30

30

 

Beam 6, Melee 3, Demolitions 2, Medical 2, Technician 3, Energy Weapons 3

 

Strip East

Die Roll

Minable Resources

1-5

1

6-8

2

9-10

3

  Although many planets consist of nothing but worthless rock and low grade iron ore, others are fairly bursting with valuable metals, gems and other resources. Mining ships are designed to transport a crewto a mineral-rich planet and serve as a base of operations while those resources are exploited.
Finding Mining Sites
  Determining whether a planet has natural resources worth mining involves as much luck as science. A mining concern can find good prospects for operations in two ways: by prospecting and by following rumors.
Prospecting
.
Prospecting involves examining samples taken from various likely locations on a planet, looking for valuable minerals. These planets might be minor outposts, uninhabitable worlds or even part of a newly discovered system.  The referee should feel free to decide himself that a planet has no valuable, minable resources, or that it is chock full of recoverable ores. If characters are examining planets randomly, the referee can use the procedure outlined below.
OreFactoryPRESENCE OF MINERALS. The base chance that an unmined planet, planetoid or asteroid belt has valuable resources is 25%. The referee can increase this slightly if the planet is very close to its star, or decrease it if the planet is at the edge of the system. The referee should make this roll secretly.
NUMBER OF RESOURCES.
If valuable resources are present, the referee should roll 1d10 to see how many resources can be mined.
FINDING DEPOSITS.
If valuable resources are present, players must find them using either a geoscanner or a landing drone. The following procedure is used when characters are searching for minerals:
   1.The referee rolls d100 to determine whether resources are present on the planet or asteroid.
   2.If resources are present, the referee rolls ldlOto determine how many resources there are.
   3.The characters choose a spot on the surface where they will search for minerals.
   4.The referee rolls ldlO. If the world contains resources, a roll of 1 means that the location where the characters are searching has resource deposits. If the world has no resources, the characters will never find any, regardless of this roll.
   5.The characters conduct a check with a geoscanner or landing drone. If the check is successful and resources are present, characters have found the resources and can begin mining.

  The characters can repeat such scans as often as they want, and in as many different places on the planet as they wish.  Rumors and "Gold Rushes." The second way to find a promising location for a mine is to follow the crowd -- travel with large groups of miners to planets that are reported to be the sites of rich strikes.  Both the Cappellan Free Merchants and the Cassidine Development Corporation (see the Referee's Background and Campaign Material section for more about these companies) sell information on possible mine locations. This information will cost 1,000 to 10,000 Cr, depending on the value of the resources. CPM and CDC provide this service to promote competition with the larger corporations.  Some prospectors also earn their livings by locating mineral deposits and selling their locations to miners. Information bought from prospectors usually costs more, but reputable prospectors will not sell a mine's location more than once.  Characters who do not want to buy information may be able to get what they want free. Characters who visit taverns and restaurants on resource worlds, space stations or other likely spots may, at the referee's discretion, hear rumors that can lead them to mineral strikes.

Dice Roll

Material

Ore / Unit

Process Time

01-10

Aluminum

4,000

4d10

11-18

Copper

1,500

1d10

19

Diamonds

20,000

12d10

20

Emeralds

25,000

14d10

21

Gold

1,000

2d10

22-36

Iron

1,000

1d10

37-43

Magnesium

 5,000

4d10

44-48

Mercury

500

2d10

49-53

Molybdenum

4,000

5d10

54-59

Nickel

4,000

3d10

60-65

Platinum

3,000

4d10

66-67

Plutonium

2,000

4d10

68-75

Quartz Crystals

1,500

2d10

76-77

Rubies

25,000

12d10

78-79

Silver

1,000

2d10

80-87

Titanium

8,000

6d10

88-90

Tungsten

4,000

2d10

91-92

Uranium

1,500

3d10

93-94

Vanadium

5,000

5d10

95-00

Zircon

2,000

5d10


Mining and Processing of Raw Materials
  Once a character has found an encouraging location for a mining operation, he must arrange to dig the material up and process it. Mining equipment and specifications for its use are listed in the Optional Spaceship Equipment section.  Once a mining operation starts, the referee can use the Raw Material Chart to determine what materials are present and other information vital to the operation. The meanings of the various entries on the table are explained below. 
DICE ROLL. The referee can use this column to randomly determine what materials are present on a world.
ORE/UNIT. This is the number of tons of ore that must be mined to yield one unit of concentrate. A unit of mined material is the same as a unit of cargo.
PROCESS TIME. Process time is the number of days needed to process ore into one unit of concentrate. A mining ship of hull size 10 needs 10times the number of days listed to completely fill its hold with mined concentrate. This processing time should bedoubled for mines using an OPL.
Playing Out. There is no guarantee that a mine will yield enough raw material to fill the hold of a mining ship. The chance that a mine will "play out" is up to the referee. This can be determined randomly by rolling 2d10. The result is the number of cargo units of concentrate that can be taken from the mine before it is exhausted.   Characters can search for new deposits on a planet if a mine plays out.
Ecological Considerations:. Some ofther more heavily populated resource-rich worlds in the Frontier have been mined to the point where the planet becomes an industrial wasteland. The lessons learned from these experiences have led some planetary governments to pass tough environmental protection laws. Specific laws are up to the referee, but they can be used to provide obstacles for an ambitious mining operation.
Transporting and Selling Ores:  Once miners have filled their ship with concentrate (or collected as much as they can), the material must be transported to a resource center and sold. A resource center is any Frontier planet with an "R" code in its Population and Trade listing in the STAR FRONTIERSrule book (p. 50). A buyer will be located within 1d10 days at the space station orbiting a resource center. The buyer will pay the amount in the "Source" column of the Cargo Chart in the freighter section.  If characters take concentrate to an Industrial world, they have a 10% chance of-f inding a buyer in 10 days. These buyers also will pay the amount at Source, not Destination.
Risks:  Because of the potential for fat, fast profits, mining operations are plump targets for pirates and unethical corporations. Unless the referee has planned encounters during amining venture, he should roll d100 and check the Mining Hazards Table once for each week a mining crew spends at the mine site.

Dice Roll

MINING HAZARDS TABLE

01-04

Pirates -- One frigate or two assault scouts are used to attack the operation in an attempt to steal the concentrate

05-10

Corporation Thugs -- Either Streel Corp. or the PGC sens two assault scouts with armed landing parties to disrupt the operation

11-19

Processing Plant Breakdown -- technician needs 2d10 days minus skill level to repeair

20-30

Wildcatters -- Independent miners set up an operation nearby; they will fight if their work is interfered with

31-00

No event this week

        

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